More on the Speakjet and TTS256 Chip

As fun as it is to use the Magnevation Speakjet shield for the Arduino, perhaps you want to do an application where you don’t want to have to program all those stupid codes, as I showed in an earlier post.

At that time I mentioned the TTS256 chip from Sparkfun, which is essentially a little text-to-speech dictionary chip made to work with the Speakjet. You pump in some regular boring text over the serial connection to the TTS256, it converts it to that phoneme stuff and presto, the chip speaks.

At the time I did that previous post I didn’t have a TTS256, but now I do. Sparkfun have a very nice tutorial on how to wire up the chip into your Speakjet shield. That tutorial is really good, and has demo code and so I will repeat none of it here.

I followed the instructions as shown and had no problems, but the difference to what I did is that rather than solder the speakjet onto the shield, I soldered on a 24-pin socket (technically two sockets, since I didn’t have a 24-pin, but the effect is the same). The advantage of doing things this way is that if you want to go back to the ‘old’ way of using the Speakjet – in direct phoneme mode – all you have to do is jumper two areas in the socket and it works as it did before you ruined it.

Seriously, always use a socket with a through-hole part if you can get away with it. Makes replacing the chip a dream when you blow it up.

I have the ‘newer’ version of the board which has the surface-mount version of the speakjet (the tutorial has the through-hole version), but the pins are the same so the locations of the solder points don’t change.

Also, the sparkfun pictures are good but aren’t so clear where the connections are, so I tried to take some clearer pictures.